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Tax Crimes Archives

IRS offers expatriates opportunity to come into compliance

People choose to revoke their United States citizenship for any number of reasons. Regardless of the reason, it is important to note that expatriates do not automatically rid themselves of their tax obligations. Those with tax debt will still need to pay their bill with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). However, the IRS recently announced procedures that may help certain individuals come into compliance.

Taxpayer takes on IRS over tax deduction, and wins

It is not uncommon for the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to question your tax filings. In some cases, the questions can result in an audit and allegations of wrongful deductions. Depending on the magnitude of the allegations, it is wise to fight back.

IRS changes focus, three targets to watch

Every once in a while, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) will issue campaigns. These campaigns are certain areas of tax compliance the agency intends to focus on in coming years. This year, the agency has publicly announced over 50 campaigns. Three specific efforts to watch include:

When understating income leads to criminal charges

A northern California attorney known for suing businesses for violations of the American With Disabilities Act, became the recent target of a federal indictment on tax fraud charges. The accusations include intentionally understating income from 2012 through 2014. If convicted, he may face with up to $100,000 fine for each count of the indictment as well as three years in prison.

IRS Criminal Investigation snapshot reflects digital shift

The agency overview highlights the amount of data seized during tax fraud and other financial crimes investigations in the last year: 1.76 petabytes. How much is that? It is huge and equivalent to 4,000 digital photos a day over your lifetime. Our brains are estimated to store memory data equivalent to 2.5 petabytes.

A look at history as tax fraud charges again make headlines

One of the most famous tax fraud cases of all time sent Al Capone to prison. Those charges were mostly based on circumstantial evidence, because the famous Chicago gangster only endorsed one check and never had a bank account in his name.